• Bradley Sing

    Bradley Sing is currently Technical Consultant at Mimecast where he has been since November 2016. Bradley has been working in the technology industry for almost four years and draws on his previous experience to help align customer business needs with the technical solutions that Mimecast provides, which ranges from product demonstrations to help documenting processes and aspects of products. Prior to his role at Mimecast, Bradley worked across the web hosting & domain name industry in Australia, working for Melbourne-based web hosting startup Hosting Australia and previously Melbourne IT Group.

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Bradley Sing

Gone phishing: how scammers are increasingly using email to steal your data

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According to ACCC’s Scamwatch, Australians lost more than $1.5 million to phishing scams alone in 2019. The number of Coronavirus scams are skyrocketing, with the Mimecast Brand EXPLOIT Protect team identifying close to 60,000 new coronavirus websites in a two-week period, most of which were malicious. 

However, there is still an enormous variety of malware phishing scams going around in Australia. One current example is disguised as an email from your bank. The email asks you to ‘update’ or ‘reset’ your password by clicking on a link. Clicking on the link takes the user to a convincing replica of the bank’s website, and presents the user with a form to enter their password.

Gone Phishing Body 1

 

Gone Phishing Body 2

 


The scammers then make off with your account number and password information.

Though these emails look convincing, especially on your smartphone, there are a few telltale signs that can tip you off to their authenticity.

How to spot an email scam

  1. The email is not addressed to you by name, uses poor English (spelling mistakes or awkward grammar are common) or omits personal details that a legitimate sender would include (e.g. a tracking ID).
     
  2. It’s from businesses you’re not expecting to hear from. Maybe from a bank you don’t have an account with, a parcel delivery service you didn’t order from, or a company you have no dealings with.
     
  3. It asks you to download a file, especially one with an .exe, .docx or .xlsx file extension.
     
  4. It takes you to a landing page or website with a weird URL. Maybe the company name is misspelled or has numbers in odd places. Maybe it doesn’t have the company’s name at all.

If you’re not sure if the email is genuine, it’s better to play it safe and call them up to confirm if they did in fact, send you an email. Taking a moment to double-check before sharing your information can protect you from a breach and save you, your co-workers and your company from a lot of headaches.

Technical Consultant, Mimecast

Bradley Sing is currently Technical Consultant at Mimecast where he has been since November 2016. Bradley has been working in the technology industry for almost four years and draws on his previous experience to help align customer business needs with the technical solutions that Mimecast provides, which ranges from product demonstrations to help documenting processes and aspects of products. Prior to his role at Mimecast, Bradley worked across the web hosting & domain name industry in Australia, working for Melbourne-based web hosting startup Hosting Australia and previously Melbourne IT Group.

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Bradley Sing